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Getting the measure of cybercrime?

Professor Steven Furnell ( Plymouth University )

Cybercrime is now a well-established and widely recognised concern, with criminal behaviour probably representing the main driver behind the huge increase in numbers of malicious programs over the last decade or so.  However, while there is no doubt that the problem exists, attempts to quantify cybercrime have resulted in dramatically varied numbers, highlighting the difficulty of trying to establish the scale, cost and impact of attacks.

In this presentation, Steven Furnell examines the nature (and potential quality) of the measures currently used to quantify cyber-dependent crime.  He then proceeds to consider the opinions of various security practitioners regarding the potential disconnect between such measurements and the aspects that are potentially more important for us to understand.  The discussion draws upon work conducted as part of a recent Home Office-funded study into the scale, trends and measurement of cyber-dependent crimes.

Speaker bio

Prof. Steven Furnell is the head of the Centre for Security, Communications & Network Research at Plymouth University (UK), an Adjunct Professor with Edith Cowan University (Western Australia) and an Honorary Professor with Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (South Africa). His interests include mobile device security, cybercrime, user authentication, and security usability. Prof. Furnell is the author of over 260 papers in refereed international journals and conference proceedings, as well as books including Cybercrime: Vandalizing the Information Society (2001) and Computer Insecurity: Risking the System (2005). He is also the editor-in-chief of Information & Computer Security, and the co-chair of the Human Aspects of Information Security & Assurance (HAISA) symposium (www.haisa.org). Steve is active in a variety of professional bodies, and is a Fellow of the BCS, a Senior Member of the IEEE, and a Board Member of the IISP. Further details can be found at www.plymouth.ac.uk/cscan, with various security podcasts available via www.cscan.org/podcasts.

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